Insureon Blog

How to Get Clients for a New Business

18. December 2017 18:05

find new clients

Prospective clients tend to look at new businesses with a healthy dose of skepticism. Not only do they want you to prove you're better than the competition, but they also want proof that you're reliable. We talked to a few entrepreneurs to see how they got clients for their new business, and they recommend that you:

  1. Share case studies.
  2. Trade work for reviews.
  3. Demonstrate industry expertise.
  4. Invest in advertising.
  5. Nurture existing clients.
  6. Embrace rejection.

Share Case Studies

When Ben Landers started analytics and digital marketing company Blue Corona, he was unknown in the industry. He didn’t have clients, a “fancy education,” or even a website.

“Think about that for a minute – a digital marketing company without a website!” Landers says.

But the biggest thing Landers says he lacked was a success story.

Landers needed a case study to show his expertise. To get it, he provided services at a discount to a previous employer. Then he says he had it printed, bound, and mailed to about 350 prospective clients. A decade later, Blue Corona has over 150 clients.

“Case study marketing worked so well for Blue Corona that it became one of our core values: make every client a case study,” says Landers.

Gil Gildner tried a similar approach when he and his business partner launched the marketing consulting firm Discosloth. They took on small projects to identify businesses that might benefit from their full offerings and pursued those leads. In just seven months, he says Discosloth has over 20 clients on retainer, and he and his partner are making more than they ever did at their nine-to-five jobs.

Trade Work for Reviews

CEO of CMK Marketing Liza Viana acknowledges that it may hurt a little to work for free, but the payoff can be worth it. She says reviews from happy clients often bring in new, paying customers.

Even better than the reviews, Viana says happy clients may also refer you to friends, colleagues, and contacts.

“Essentially, they’re helping to market you to what normally would be a cold audience for your business,” she says.

For more on the power of online reviews, read “Make a Better Impression on 88% of Your Potential Clients.”

Demonstrate Industry Expertise

Case studies and reviews show you can get results, but demonstrating your knowledge helps clients trust you.  To solidify your standing:

Bonus tip: Business insurance can also show your professionalism. Clients often see insurance as a sign a financially responsible business owner. Read "Behind the Contract: Business Lawyers on Insurance Requirements" for more details.

Invest in Advertising

Janet Attard, founder and CEO of small business information site Business Know-How, says advertising where your competitor advertises has two advantages for new businesses.

“When you advertise, you look like a more established business – and you get your name in front of people looking for what you sell,” Attard says.

Ads can be costly, so be precise with placements. Gilder says his company used just two niche channels to advertise.

“Each of these channels paid for themselves, but it took months,” he says.

Read “Digital Marketing Game Plan: 8 Ways to Reach New Customers Online” for more ideas.

Nurture Existing Clients

Taking care of clients you have can help in two ways: It encourages retention and it might lead to referrals.

Deborah Sweeney, CEO of MyCorporation.com, a leading legal filling services site, says a newsletter can help you reach those goals. She recommends creating a newsletter that…

Not sure a newsletter is right for you? Read “3 Signs Your Business Could Benefit from an Email Newsletter.”

Embrace Rejection

Once you have experience and have proven yourself with your first few clients, it’s time to leverage that work and expand your reach to your ideal clients, web designer Charlotte O’Hara says.

“It’ll be a numbers game, meaning that you will get rejected more often than not, but you’ll also build your client base and grow your business over time,” O’Hara says.

About the Contributors

Janet Attard is the owner of BusinessKnowHow.com, a small business information website.

Gil Gildner is the cofounder of the marketing consulting firm Discosloth. He spent five years freelancing as a creative producer for organizations across the world, and he holds a bachelor’s in visual media.

Ben Landers is president and CEO of Blue Corona, a six-time Inc. 5000 analytics and digital marketing company.

Charlotte O’Hara is a web developer/designer and writer based in Vancouver, BC. Her professional website is Charlotteohara.ca.

Deborah Sweeney is the CEO of MyCorporation.com. MyCorporation is a leader in online legal filing services for entrepreneurs and businesses, providing startup bundles that include corporation and LLC formation, registered agent, DBA, and trademark & copyright filing services. MyCorporation does all the work, making the business formation and maintenance quick and painless, so business owners can focus on what they do best.

Liza Viana is CEO and content & social media strategist of CMK Marketing. With offices in upstate New York and New Jersey, CMK Marketing provides a variety of marketing services to clients throughout the country. Services include: website design, graphic design, search engine optimization, social media marketing and advertising, video, email marketing, and content marketing.

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